Posts Tagged With: travel

The Holly-n-Ivy

My great-grandmother seemed to be called Aunt Lilly by everyone.  Growing up, I always heard this room referred to as “Aunt Lilly’s room”.  She loved her dogs, and was a talented painter (check back later for a post on her paintings).  Here she is on the driveway side steps of Bayfields sometime in the 1960’s.

 

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Aunt Lilly and her beloved dogs.

I always thought Aunt Lilly’s room was the most wonderful room in the entire house. Later, when we moved into the house, we noticed that the only way to get to Aunt Lilly’s room, one must pass through another bedroom.  For a while, my daughter and her husband lived in this room and used it as a 2 room suite.  One room for the bedroom, and the other as a sitting room with a TV.  My sister’s name is Holly, and when our daughter was born on Christmas day, we named her Ivy.  My favorite Christmas storybook fairy tale was the story of Holly & Ivy, so I thought to keep with the fairytale-room-naming-theme.  I named these rooms “The Holly-n-Ivy”.

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My favorite Christmas fairy tale.

After Ivy and her husband moved, I began renting it out as a 2 room suite that sleeps up 4 people.  Since those sleeping in the queen must pass through the sitting room to come and go, I think it’s best that it be reserved by families or good friends who know each other well enough to share.  The sitting room faces the driveway and has a barnyard/dock view with a 22″ TV. The couch has been replaced with a daybed that can convert into 2 twins or one king bed.

 

The main bedroom has a memoryfoam queen mattress with a slanted ceiling, a wrap-around balcony with a view of the barnyard, dock, creek, river, beach, and Chesapeake Bay.

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Queen bed in the Holly-n-Ivy

To add comfort for our guests, in these 2 rooms we’ve installed 2 ceiling fans, bedside lamps, 4 new vinyl windows (that actually open, ha ha), a fresh coat of paint, refinished floors, and a new doorway leading out onto the balcony.

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Butterflies Love the Dog Days of Summer

Butterfly at Bayfields

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly on the Tiger Lilies at Bayfields

The lilies are extra beautiful at Bayfields this year. The butterflies are really enjoying them. May Heintz planted these flower beds of Tiger Lilies and Day Lilies here,  in the late 1940s.

We get lovely Chesapeake Bay breezes, to keep the lilies and the butterflies cool and comfortable, even in the Dog Days of Summer. Dog Days refer to the  the hot sultry weather that we have in July and August. The Romans associated the hot weather with the star Sirius. They considered Sirius to be the “Dog Star” because it is the brightest star in the constellation Canis Major (Large Dog).

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails have a dark morph in addition to the common yellow form. The black form is always female. Click here to see pictures of different kinds of Swallowtails.

Photo Credit: Keri Budd
Guitar cover of Heart’s Dog and Butterfly on my video: Mark Budd

Come travel to see us at Bayfields, a bed and breakfast on the West River, in Maryland, with a great view of the Chesapeake Bay.

~Holly

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Our Forestry Management Plan

The lawn surrounding Bayfields used to be pasture for sheep and cattle  Long before that, there is evidence that Native Americans used to hunt along these same shores. In 1921 the house was built, and later a fence was put up around the house to keep livestock from eating the missus’s flowers.
In order to preserve the property for generations to come, we’re working with the DNR(Department of Natural Resources) in order to follow a forestry management plan. This will enable us to help sustain native wildlife and preserve our shoreline, just by reforesting some of the open lawn here at Bayfields. At the advice and recommendations of a DNR approved professional forester, we’re planting about 150 seedlings using trees native to the area.

Reforestation project plans showing approximate positions of where we'll plant seedlings.

Reforestation project plans showing approximate positions of where we’ll plant seedlings.

Above is a mock up of our reforestation project plans showing approximate positions of where we’ll plant seedlings.

Volunteer tiny little baby oak seedling.

Volunteer tiny little baby oak seedling, with it’s very own flag.

On your left is what often happens when I neglected to mow a patch for a while.  As you can easily see, there’s already evidence of tiny trees trying to sprout.  Last fall, we marked off the areas that we planned to NOT mow.  This spring we’re discovering many clusters of volunteer seedlings popping up all over. It’s like an Easter egg hunt with tiny little prizes all over.  As we discover new ones, we mark them with little green flags.

DNR Seedlings from left to right, Sycamore, Black Locust, White Pine, Flowering Plum

DNR Seedlings from left to right, Sycamore, Black Locust, White Pine, Flowering Plum, and Dogwood from Jug Bay Native Plant Sale.

We ordered some seedlings and saplings from the DNR; 25 sycamore, 25 flowering plum, 50 white pine, and 25 black locust.  The prices were very reasonable, averaging 85 cents per seedling for a minimum order of 25.  The exception were the pine saplings, which were 50 cents a piece with a minimum order of 50.  I ordered late, so the beech, oak, dogwood, and redbuds were all sold out.  They all came together UPS just a few days later. We had to sign an agreement that these trees would be planted in Maryland, not sold for profit, and wouldn’t be chopped down and sold as christmas trees.  The bargain 500 dogwood and redbud seeds that I ordered from Amazon required much too much preparation time to have ready to plant this spring(soak, chill, scrub, scratch, soak, chill, plant), so we picked up 25 dogwood seedlings from a Jug Bay native plant sale this past weekend.  Perhaps we’ll create a little grove of redbud and dogwood next door in Mom’s forest next spring.

two year old volunteer oak and dogwood

These are several two year old volunteer oaks and one dogwood

In the photo to your right,  you can see  a few seedlings that have gotten a 2 year head start where an old stump was difficult to mow around.  There are several oaks and one dogwood.  Our new forest will go from the beach to the flagpole and over beside the porch, but should be spaced far enough apart that we can stroll across the grounds and not get lost.

3 year volunteer oak, already showing promise of shading St. Francis yet not blocking view.

3 year volunteer oak, already showing promise of shading St. Francis yet not blocking view.

This last photo above shows a 3 year old oak seedling that I pruned the lower branches off of last year.  It’s already showing promise of growing up to be a great strong shade tree. For now, it will be the protector of our grandmother’s little St. Francis statue, protector of the animals.

Come stay for a weekend, I’ll hand you a shovel.  You can become part of the tree planting!

Thanks for reading,
-Robin

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The Salamanders Know Spring Is Here

Favorite Signs of Spring

One of my favorite signs of spring is discovering amphibian eggs, whether they be frog, toad, or salamander. I was very happy when we found salamanders and their eggs while opening the fish pond at Bayfields.

Eggs of the Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) found in the fish pond at Bayfields, April 5, 2013

Eggs of the Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) found in the fish pond at Bayfields, April 5, 2013

We discovered three Spotted Salamanders, (Ambystoma maculatum).

 Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) found in the fish pond at Bayfields, April 5, 2013

Spotted Salamander 1.
(Ambystoma maculatum) found in the fish pond at Bayfields, April 5, 2013

Each one has a unique spot pattern.

Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) found in the fish pond at Bayfields, April 5, 2013

Spotted Salamander 2.
(Ambystoma maculatum) found in the fish pond at Bayfields, April 5, 2013

Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) found in the fish pond at Bayfields, April 5, 2013

Spotted Salamander 3.
(Ambystoma maculatum) found in the fish pond at Bayfields, April 5, 2013

We let them go, back into the pond.  They are active at night.  After the salamanders are done with breeding and egg laying, they will return to their underground burrows in the woods.  The eggs will hatch in May-June, with feathery gills, and no hind limbs.  The new generation of spotted salamanders will leave the pond in August or September, travel back to their forest home, and get there spots soon after.

You can learn more about the Spotted Salamander at the Maryland Department Of Natural Resources page, and the Towson University Herpetology page for the Spotted Salamander.

~Holly

Bayfields is a bed and breakfast on the West River, in Maryland, with a great view of the Chesapeake Bay. Make your reservations to travel to visit us!  You can learn more, and make your reservations, with bnb, here.

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Reforestation on the Shore of the West River

Acorns started in my greenhouse under the tangerine tree.

Acorns under the tangerine tree.

Yesterday it was cold and windy, as my cousin and I scurried around like squirrels gathering acorns from the large white and red oaks at Bayfields.  The acorns are already starting to sprout, sending their tap root deep into the cold ground, long before the new green leaves unfurl in the spring.

Today I planted 136 acorns, in flats, in my sun warmed greenhouse, under the tangerine tree.  We will transplant them to Bayfields when the weather warms, because we are reforesting a lot of the lawn.

It will be like our own arboretum!  I can make a tree map.

-Holly Heintz Budd

Bayfields is a bed and breakfast on the West River, in Maryland, with a great view of the Chesapeake Bay. You can learn more, and make your reservations here.

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Thankful that Wind and Water Passed Us By This Time

High water before and during Super Storm Sandy at Bayfields on the West River

High water before and during Super Storm Sandy at Bayfields on the West River

Super Storm Sandy did not cause major harm to Bayfields.  No damaging winds. The tides no more than 2 foot above normal. Wish Sandy was as kind to New Jersey and New York.

-Holly Heintz Budd

Bayfields is a bed and breakfast on the West River, in Maryland, with a great view of the Chesapeake Bay.

You can learn more, and make your reservations here.

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Bayfields Before Hurricane Sandy

Bayfields is beautiful in the fall.  I love the golden leaves in contrast with the grey water.  Today we were readying everything just in case the “Frankenstorm”  turns out to be a bad one.  It is about 7 miles from Bayfields out the mouth of the West River, and directly across the Chesapeake, to the Eastern Shore.  So if winds are directly out of the east, the shore line could take a beating.  The house, built in 1921, has been above the flood wars so far.  Enjoy the “Before Hurricane Sandy” pictures.

Bayfields in the Fall

Bayfields in the Fall

Not too windy yet. Got to get the flag down before the storm.

The shoreline of Bayfields on the West River, Saturday, before the storm.

A nice spot for a break.

Oysters for the Hurricane party

Oysters for the Hurricane party

Bayfields is a bed and breakfast on the West River, in Maryland, with a great view of the Chesapeake Bay.

-Holly Heintz Budd

You can learn more, and make your reservations here.

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Oysters at Bayfields

Oyster Floats at Bayfields

Oyster Floats at Bayfields

Many years ago, sheep grazed here at Bayfields.   More recently, my grandparents raised chickens and tended large vegetable and flower gardens. My father used a donkey cart to deliver crabs that he caught in the West River.

I grew up in this tradition, learning about farming from my grandparents, and catching crabs and fish to sell to my neighbors. Currently I am experimenting with aquaculture. I “planted” thousands of oysters in Popham Creek l. I got the oyster spat from Circle C Oyster Ranching. Rich Pelz has been doing a lot of work to breed oysters that grow quickly and are disease resistant. They are plump with thin, easy open shells. All this without GMOs!

I love Rich’s plan for growing the oysters:  For millions of years, oysters thrived on the bottom of the bay and its tributaries. Now, though, the water in the bay is so murky that the light does not reach the bottom, so there’s no longer enough food or oxygen for them there. With Rich’s plan, my oysters get to grow in bags which protect them from predators, and with floats to keep them on the surface, where all the algae and oxygen is. One oyster filters 55 gallons of water a day. So not only am I growing tasty food, I am cleaning the Chesapeake Bay too!

Oyster floats provide habitat for wildlife. In addition to this small fish called a Blenny, we find Black Fingered Mud Crab, White Fingered Mud Cab, Goby, Skilletfish, American Eel, Annelid Worm, Muscles, and Barnacles,

Oyster floats provide habitat for wildlife. In addition to this small fish called a Blenny, we find Black Fingered Mud Crab, White Fingered Mud Cab, Goby, Skilletfish, American Eel, Annelid Worm, Muscles, and Barnacles,

Black Fingered Mud Crab lives amongst the Oysters.

Washing the Oysters

Oysters on the Barbie, delicious!

So travel to see us at Bayfields Bed and Breakfast, to see our “home oyster aquiculture project” cleaning the bay.

-Holly Heintz Budd

To reserve a room at Bayfields, click here.

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Hello world!

Greetings,

Good news!  The wedding is over and the bed and breakfast is up and running with our first guests.

So whether your are looking for a quick getaway on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay, or plan is to travel far and wide, come visit us at Bayfields, our bed and breakfast on the West River, in Maryland.

-The Heintz Family

We are listed here on Air BnB.

This is just a really quick post to get this site up and running.  Pictures, history and more will follow.

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