Posts Tagged With: Maryland

The Holly-n-Ivy

My great-grandmother seemed to be called Aunt Lilly by everyone.  Growing up, I always heard this room referred to as “Aunt Lilly’s room”.  She loved her dogs, and was a talented painter (check back later for a post on her paintings).  Here she is on the driveway side steps of Bayfields sometime in the 1960’s.

 

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Aunt Lilly and her beloved dogs.

I always thought Aunt Lilly’s room was the most wonderful room in the entire house. Later, when we moved into the house, we noticed that the only way to get to Aunt Lilly’s room, one must pass through another bedroom.  For a while, my daughter and her husband lived in this room and used it as a 2 room suite.  One room for the bedroom, and the other as a sitting room with a TV.  My sister’s name is Holly, and when our daughter was born on Christmas day, we named her Ivy.  My favorite Christmas storybook fairy tale was the story of Holly & Ivy, so I thought to keep with the fairytale-room-naming-theme.  I named these rooms “The Holly-n-Ivy”.

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My favorite Christmas fairy tale.

After Ivy and her husband moved, I began renting it out as a 2 room suite that sleeps up 4 people.  Since those sleeping in the queen must pass through the sitting room to come and go, I think it’s best that it be reserved by families or good friends who know each other well enough to share.  The sitting room faces the driveway and has a barnyard/dock view with a 22″ TV. The couch has been replaced with a daybed that can convert into 2 twins or one king bed.

 

The main bedroom has a memoryfoam queen mattress with a slanted ceiling, a wrap-around balcony with a view of the barnyard, dock, creek, river, beach, and Chesapeake Bay.

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Queen bed in the Holly-n-Ivy

To add comfort for our guests, in these 2 rooms we’ve installed 2 ceiling fans, bedside lamps, 4 new vinyl windows (that actually open, ha ha), a fresh coat of paint, refinished floors, and a new doorway leading out onto the balcony.

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Home Garden Home of the Week: Historic Harwood Home is Reborn After a Major Fire

Bayfields B&B Mixes Tales of Faeries, Phantoms, and Fowl

Robin Heintz Anderson's Home of the Week in Harwood. Photos By Joshua McKerrow, Staff / September 3, 2014

Robin Heintz Anderson’s Home of the Week in Harwood.

By Wendi Winters, wwinters@capgaznews.com
Photos By Joshua McKerrow

5:00 p.m. EDT, September 19, 2014 in the Capitol Gazette
Originally published in print in the Evening Capitol.

During the jaunt to the Harwood family home of Robin Heintz Anderson, it feels like an adventure awaits around the next woodland corner.

Pulling up to what appears to be the front door of the main house, we’re not sure where to look first.

There is an antique horse-drawn, open air carriage — sort of a long-ago pick-up truck. And, a prominent duck crossing sign.

Dusty is cantering about a fenced-in area. The half-Arab, half-quarter horse is followed by 8-year-olds Pixie the goat and Rosie the sheep.

They’re all show biz critters: Dusty does double-duty as a unicorn during the Maryland Faerie Festival in Darlington, (www.marylandfaeriefestival.org), while Pixie and Rose have done cameo appearances on the Animal Planet TV network.

Chickens roam their land on the grounds of Robin Heintz Anderson's Home of the Week, and bed and breakfast, in Harwood. Photos By Joshua McKerrow, Staff / September 3, 2014

Chickens roam their land on the grounds of Robin Heintz Anderson’s Home of the Week, and bed and breakfast, in Harwood.

Fluttering around outside their enclosure is one of the nine chickens. When she sees us approaching, the chicken flies over a fence into safe territory.

The fowl are enjoying their sunshine. At dusk, they get herded and locked into the henhouse. A solar-powered timer reopens the door at sunrise.

The hens lay eggs in hues of cinnamon, pale browns and blues.

Off to the left, beyond a small barn, is a long dock, stretching into the West River. Lying in the water, next to the pier, are nine flats, each containing 750 oysters. For several years, the family raises the bivalves, which filter the nearby water. Then, the home’s residents and guests eat them and start anew with a fresh set of spat.

On the other side of the house, a large in-ground pool invitingly glistens. Along the wide waterfront are a couple outdoor sets of tables and chairs.

The view is worth a long drink.

The 13-acre property has a long, curved waterfront overlooking the mouth of the West River and the Chesapeake Bay. Far across the water is the Eastern Shore. Closer in and to the right is the Galesville shoreline.

Then, we turn around.

There’s a front door. It’s facing the water.

A historic owner

“When the house was built in 1921, the only way to reach the house was by water,” said Robin Heintz Anderson. She is the caretaker of the property and residence owned by her mother Shirley Heintz, who lives in a nearby house.

The five-bedroom, three-bath house was built by the late Charles Carroll Glover, president of Riggs Bank in the late 1800s. He was involved in the establishment of the National Zoo and Rock Creek Park in Washington, D.C. His land holdings included most of what is now Chevy Chase.

The house, on what was then a property of more than 200-acres, was intended as a summer cottage with views of Galesville, Tenthouse and Popham creeks, the West River and the Chesapeake Bay.

Today, it is often used as a film location by The Weather Channel.

Yet, Glover’s wife wasn’t impressed with the rural property. Livestock apparently wandered the grounds. Glover had fencing put up around the house, but that failed to satisfy her. She decided it was too remote, too far away from D.C. society.

For a while, it served as a retreat house for an order of nuns.

Anderson’s grandfather, William Heintz, had watched from afar as the house was being constructed and occasionally hunted squirrels on the property.

He had sailed to Galesville aboard the steamboat Emma Giles in the early part of the 20th century and raised his family in the small bay-side town.

In the 1940s, after Glover’s death in 1936, his estate was broken into five to seven-acre lots and sold off.

Heintz purchased the 13-acre parcel containing the main house, and in 1946 put his own touches on the residence, including the addition of a glass and steel greenhouse. His wife, May Heintz, loved the place. The couple won numerous awards in sailboat races on the nearby waters.

Heintz also turned the third floor servants’ quarters into extra bedrooms for his growing family.

When his daughter-in-law Shirley Heintz arrived at the property years later, she was startled.

“I heard it was on the water, but here was all of this water. This beautiful view, the West River,” Heintz said. “It was so long ago, there were still oyster shells along the sides of the roadway.”

William Heintz made a few changes to the house. He made the entry on the rear of the house the main entry as it faced the road — cars had replaced boats as the major mode of transportation. He removed the main floor’s pocket doors — what ironically is a major trend today had gone out of style then.

The kitchen was reconfigured. A hall doorway was closed off and a corner cabinet or bowfat, also known as a buffet, was moved from the kitchen and placed in a dining room corner.

The house has been the site of fires in the kitchen and living room.

The most recent fire, Feb. 19, 2011, was a two-alarm blaze that brought fire equipment from Annapolis, Waugh Chapel, West Annapolis, Galesville, Woodland Beach, Harwood, Jones Road, North Beach and Upper Marlboro to the scene. The equipment formed nearly a mile-long string down the roadway. Since no hydrants were in the area, a fire boat motored to the site.

It was 14 months before the house passed inspection and its residents could return.

During that period, more subtle changes were made to the house. The floors were refinished throughout the house. All the walls received a new coat of paint. A second door to the upstairs porch was added.

In the kitchen, three layers of linoleum were peeled away to reveal the heart of pine flooring. The original butler’s pantry, which had been turned into a laundry room, was restored.

Invited and uninvited guests

What the fire didn’t destroy were the periodic, inexplicable appearances of ghostly apparitions. Some say a mysterious white dog has been spotted scooting in and out of upstairs rooms. Pictures drop off walls and mantels, even when no wind is stirring, nor any windows open. A grandfather clock will suddenly start chiming. A vintage music box began blaring three days after its original owner passed away. Visitors have spotted an elderly woman, who resembles William Heintz’s sister Lily, sitting in a room.

During a taping of A&E’s pilot episode of its series, “Possessed,” the production staff realized a volume of Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s “The Possessed” had been taken from the shelf of the home’s library and placed prominently on an end table. Next to a vintage rotary phone.

Spooky.

A medium called in by the family heard children playing in a hidden room behind a closet — the Heintz family had not disclosed the old crawl space to the medium before her surprising pronouncement.

Despite — or because of — the home’s history, it is a popular B & B, known as Bayfields Bed & Breakfast, with Airbnb, (http://www.Bayfields.org).

Robin Heintz Anderson is the innkeeper.

Robin Heintz Anderson, with her dog Petey, in her Home of the Week, and bed and breakfast, in Harwood.

Robin Heintz Anderson, with her dog Petey, in her Home of the Week, and bed and breakfast, in Harwood.

Visitors are greeted by an excited Petey aka Bad Dog Pete, an 8-year old canine ball of fur. He wears a vest advising: “NO, it’s not okay to let me jump up on you. NO JUMPING.”

From the roadside doorway, one can look straight down the hallway to the waterside doorway. The handsome wooden staircase, which spirals upward to the third floor, faces the water. To the right is the dining room, kitchen, and the greenhouse. On the left is the living room, a library and a screened-in covered porch.

In the library are vintage photos of the Emma Giles, family sailboats and an ancestor, George Heintz Jr., a fencing champion in the late 19th century. Mounted on wooden plaques are half-models of favorite sailing vessels.

The floor-to-ceiling bookshelves contain at least two sets of vintage encyclopedias. Remember those? Plus, a lot of tempting, classic novels. Anderson noted the older books survived the fire with the least amount of damage, just a hint of smokiness when one thumbs through the pages.

During the post-fire renovations, workers uncovered a brick flue in the library, on the reverse side of the living room fireplace. Anderson insisted it be left uncovered, giving the room a less formal look.

In the new bathroom adjacent to the library, Anderson maintained the vintage feel of the house. The lower walls are sheathed in white beadboard. The floors feature a basket weave tile pattern, typical of popular 1920s tile work. The enamel sink has a déjà vu look.

An eye-catcher in the living room — a comfortable space — was Anderson’s collection of empty, antique wooden frames, stacked against a wall. Eerie, yet cool.

A long, wide, screened in porch, reached through the living room, runs along a quarter of the home’s water side.

On the opposite side of the house is the greenhouse, which, in addition to plants, has a hot tub and a cedar sauna cabinet for two.

Upstairs, the B&B rooms have been named for children’s stories and faerie tales. In each room, the book that inspired its name is placed prominently for their guests’ enjoyment. The Holly ‘n’ Ivy is a two bedroom unit on the second floor. A large bed is placed in one room, and a smaller room is the sitting room. It has a day bed that can convert to a couch. It is used by couples who bring their children with them. Also on that floor is the Blue Willow with its companion book, “The Legend of the Blue Willow.”

Anderson’s room is on this floor, too. The orange-and-cream patterned

spread, piled high with pillows, and flanked by drape-laden windows, mirrors the warm, deep red color of the wood floor.

On the third floor, Rapunzel is the name of one guest room, Hansel and Gretel, with two single beds, is the other.

There was a wicked witch in both of those stories.

But, she’s nowhere to be seen in this magical manor.

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Our Forestry Management Plan

The lawn surrounding Bayfields used to be pasture for sheep and cattle  Long before that, there is evidence that Native Americans used to hunt along these same shores. In 1921 the house was built, and later a fence was put up around the house to keep livestock from eating the missus’s flowers.
In order to preserve the property for generations to come, we’re working with the DNR(Department of Natural Resources) in order to follow a forestry management plan. This will enable us to help sustain native wildlife and preserve our shoreline, just by reforesting some of the open lawn here at Bayfields. At the advice and recommendations of a DNR approved professional forester, we’re planting about 150 seedlings using trees native to the area.

Reforestation project plans showing approximate positions of where we'll plant seedlings.

Reforestation project plans showing approximate positions of where we’ll plant seedlings.

Above is a mock up of our reforestation project plans showing approximate positions of where we’ll plant seedlings.

Volunteer tiny little baby oak seedling.

Volunteer tiny little baby oak seedling, with it’s very own flag.

On your left is what often happens when I neglected to mow a patch for a while.  As you can easily see, there’s already evidence of tiny trees trying to sprout.  Last fall, we marked off the areas that we planned to NOT mow.  This spring we’re discovering many clusters of volunteer seedlings popping up all over. It’s like an Easter egg hunt with tiny little prizes all over.  As we discover new ones, we mark them with little green flags.

DNR Seedlings from left to right, Sycamore, Black Locust, White Pine, Flowering Plum

DNR Seedlings from left to right, Sycamore, Black Locust, White Pine, Flowering Plum, and Dogwood from Jug Bay Native Plant Sale.

We ordered some seedlings and saplings from the DNR; 25 sycamore, 25 flowering plum, 50 white pine, and 25 black locust.  The prices were very reasonable, averaging 85 cents per seedling for a minimum order of 25.  The exception were the pine saplings, which were 50 cents a piece with a minimum order of 50.  I ordered late, so the beech, oak, dogwood, and redbuds were all sold out.  They all came together UPS just a few days later. We had to sign an agreement that these trees would be planted in Maryland, not sold for profit, and wouldn’t be chopped down and sold as christmas trees.  The bargain 500 dogwood and redbud seeds that I ordered from Amazon required much too much preparation time to have ready to plant this spring(soak, chill, scrub, scratch, soak, chill, plant), so we picked up 25 dogwood seedlings from a Jug Bay native plant sale this past weekend.  Perhaps we’ll create a little grove of redbud and dogwood next door in Mom’s forest next spring.

two year old volunteer oak and dogwood

These are several two year old volunteer oaks and one dogwood

In the photo to your right,  you can see  a few seedlings that have gotten a 2 year head start where an old stump was difficult to mow around.  There are several oaks and one dogwood.  Our new forest will go from the beach to the flagpole and over beside the porch, but should be spaced far enough apart that we can stroll across the grounds and not get lost.

3 year volunteer oak, already showing promise of shading St. Francis yet not blocking view.

3 year volunteer oak, already showing promise of shading St. Francis yet not blocking view.

This last photo above shows a 3 year old oak seedling that I pruned the lower branches off of last year.  It’s already showing promise of growing up to be a great strong shade tree. For now, it will be the protector of our grandmother’s little St. Francis statue, protector of the animals.

Come stay for a weekend, I’ll hand you a shovel.  You can become part of the tree planting!

Thanks for reading,
-Robin

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Thankful that Wind and Water Passed Us By This Time

High water before and during Super Storm Sandy at Bayfields on the West River

High water before and during Super Storm Sandy at Bayfields on the West River

Super Storm Sandy did not cause major harm to Bayfields.  No damaging winds. The tides no more than 2 foot above normal. Wish Sandy was as kind to New Jersey and New York.

-Holly Heintz Budd

Bayfields is a bed and breakfast on the West River, in Maryland, with a great view of the Chesapeake Bay.

You can learn more, and make your reservations here.

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Bayfields Before Hurricane Sandy

Bayfields is beautiful in the fall.  I love the golden leaves in contrast with the grey water.  Today we were readying everything just in case the “Frankenstorm”  turns out to be a bad one.  It is about 7 miles from Bayfields out the mouth of the West River, and directly across the Chesapeake, to the Eastern Shore.  So if winds are directly out of the east, the shore line could take a beating.  The house, built in 1921, has been above the flood wars so far.  Enjoy the “Before Hurricane Sandy” pictures.

Bayfields in the Fall

Bayfields in the Fall

Not too windy yet. Got to get the flag down before the storm.

The shoreline of Bayfields on the West River, Saturday, before the storm.

A nice spot for a break.

Oysters for the Hurricane party

Oysters for the Hurricane party

Bayfields is a bed and breakfast on the West River, in Maryland, with a great view of the Chesapeake Bay.

-Holly Heintz Budd

You can learn more, and make your reservations here.

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Oysters at Bayfields

Oyster Floats at Bayfields

Oyster Floats at Bayfields

Many years ago, sheep grazed here at Bayfields.   More recently, my grandparents raised chickens and tended large vegetable and flower gardens. My father used a donkey cart to deliver crabs that he caught in the West River.

I grew up in this tradition, learning about farming from my grandparents, and catching crabs and fish to sell to my neighbors. Currently I am experimenting with aquaculture. I “planted” thousands of oysters in Popham Creek l. I got the oyster spat from Circle C Oyster Ranching. Rich Pelz has been doing a lot of work to breed oysters that grow quickly and are disease resistant. They are plump with thin, easy open shells. All this without GMOs!

I love Rich’s plan for growing the oysters:  For millions of years, oysters thrived on the bottom of the bay and its tributaries. Now, though, the water in the bay is so murky that the light does not reach the bottom, so there’s no longer enough food or oxygen for them there. With Rich’s plan, my oysters get to grow in bags which protect them from predators, and with floats to keep them on the surface, where all the algae and oxygen is. One oyster filters 55 gallons of water a day. So not only am I growing tasty food, I am cleaning the Chesapeake Bay too!

Oyster floats provide habitat for wildlife. In addition to this small fish called a Blenny, we find Black Fingered Mud Crab, White Fingered Mud Cab, Goby, Skilletfish, American Eel, Annelid Worm, Muscles, and Barnacles,

Oyster floats provide habitat for wildlife. In addition to this small fish called a Blenny, we find Black Fingered Mud Crab, White Fingered Mud Cab, Goby, Skilletfish, American Eel, Annelid Worm, Muscles, and Barnacles,

Black Fingered Mud Crab lives amongst the Oysters.

Washing the Oysters

Oysters on the Barbie, delicious!

So travel to see us at Bayfields Bed and Breakfast, to see our “home oyster aquiculture project” cleaning the bay.

-Holly Heintz Budd

To reserve a room at Bayfields, click here.

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Hello world!

Greetings,

Good news!  The wedding is over and the bed and breakfast is up and running with our first guests.

So whether your are looking for a quick getaway on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay, or plan is to travel far and wide, come visit us at Bayfields, our bed and breakfast on the West River, in Maryland.

-The Heintz Family

We are listed here on Air BnB.

This is just a really quick post to get this site up and running.  Pictures, history and more will follow.

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